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ComingOut

Heartbreak High star Ayesha Madon comes out as bisexual

‘Heartbreak High’ star Ayesha Madon comes out as bisexual

Ayesha Madon
IOIO IMAGES/Shutterstock

“My first kiss was with a girl. I’ve actually never spoken about my sexuality before in anything, so this is pretty new.”

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Pride month may be over, but singer and star of Heartbreak High Ayesha Madon gave us another reason to feel proud when she came out as bisexual in an interview withGay Times.

While she’s only now coming out bi, it's something that she’s been processing for a while. “When I was growing up, I felt myself being conditioned or gaslighted into thinking that I was straight. I look back now at all these signs that I’ve had crushes on girls my whole life but in my head, I was like ‘Oh that’s just nothing!’” she recalled.

“I only kind of properly admitted, out loud, that I was bisexual two or three years ago. It feels recent. It’s pretty interesting watching myself be attracted to [girls]. My first kiss was with a girl. I’ve actually never spoken about my sexuality before in anything, so this is pretty new,” she shared.

She went on to tell the story of that first kiss, and it's honestly so cute. “My first kiss was with a girl called Louise and I had the biggest crush on her. She was in my acting class when I was like 11. I remember she was chewing gum and in order to kiss her I had to like to pretend that I wanted to like try the gum!” she recalled. “We kissed and it was amazing. Since then, I had the inkling, but being surrounded by so many creatives and how much more normalized it’s becoming. It has given me the courage to feel comfortable in that as well. Sometimes I feel like I’m a fake queer person because I’m not massive on queer culture, sometimes, I feel that liking girls is not enough?”

The singer whose latest single ‘Blame Me’ is out now opened up about her favorite queer musicians and along with Chappell Roan and Reneé Rapp, Madon gushed over Rina Sawayama. “There’s something about her work that feels profound and that was always the type of music that I wanted to make. I wanted to make political music, I wanted to make ironic and funny music – I never saw anyone do it until Rina Sawayama. She kind of changed the game for me.”

Relatable. We can’t wait to see what Madon and we’re proud to call her family.

30 Years of Out100Out / Advocate Magazine - Jonathan Groff and Wayne Brady

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Rachel Shatto

EIC of PRIDE.com

Rachel Shatto, Editor in Chief of PRIDE.com, is an SF Bay Area-based writer, podcaster, and former editor of Curve magazine, where she honed her passion for writing about social justice and sex (and their frequent intersection). Her work has appeared on Elite Daily, Tecca, and Joystiq, and she podcasts regularly about horror on the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network. She can’t live without cats, vintage style, video games, drag queens, or the Oxford comma.

Rachel Shatto, Editor in Chief of PRIDE.com, is an SF Bay Area-based writer, podcaster, and former editor of Curve magazine, where she honed her passion for writing about social justice and sex (and their frequent intersection). Her work has appeared on Elite Daily, Tecca, and Joystiq, and she podcasts regularly about horror on the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network. She can’t live without cats, vintage style, video games, drag queens, or the Oxford comma.