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Dove Cameron Opened Up About How Her Life Has Changed Since Coming Out As Bi

Dove Cameron On How Her Life Has Changed Since Coming Out As Bi

Dove Cameron On How Her Life Has Changed Since Coming Out As Bi
Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for MRC

“I always knew who I was. Ever since I can remember, I knew I was queer.”

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For Dove Cameron, coming out as bi not only changed her life but vastly improved her mental health, the “Boyfriend” singer said in an interview with E! News.

Cameron first came out in 2020 when, during an Instagram live, she referred to herself as “super queer.” She then further clarified that she’s bisexual in her cover story for Gay Times in June 2021. Being open and honest about this facet of her identity changed the singer’s life.

“I honestly look back at that first initial foray into the conversation about my sexuality as my first time ever really being myself publicly,” she told E! . Cameron added that coming out wasn’t meant to be a shocking disclosure, but rather just allowing the world into a more personal and private part of her life. “I think there’s this narrative where if you are a queer person and you speak about your identity, it’s as though you’ve been sitting on a secret your whole life and it’s this big revelation. Where in my experience, it wasn’t a revelation. I always knew who I was. Ever since I can remember, I knew I was queer,” she said.

Cameron explained she was daunted by the intimacy of the disclosure, but after having shared it, she has no regrets. “I wasn’t ever afraid of people knowing who I loved,” she explained. “More so, I was afraid of people having access to the human parts of me in an industry that can be so anti-human. That was definitely an emotional thing, but it turned out to be the best thing that could have ever happened to me. Mentally, I’m so much better now.”

Cameron went on to encourage her followers, particularly younger ones, to use social media to incite change. “Social media has changed so much for activism and for community involvement,” she said. “I like to tell my younger fans, support your queer friends. Be in queer conversations. Create an open space within you, within your community, within your circles and that’s enough.”

And in the spirit of Pride month, Cameron encouraged her fans to follow her example and embrace who they are.  “It’s just about getting out of our own way and not fighting who we are and that’s really the best service that we can give to ourselves,” she said. “And if we do that, even the most impossible things can take place.”

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Rachel Shatto

EIC of PRIDE.com

Rachel Shatto, Editor in Chief of PRIDE.com, is an SF Bay Area-based writer, podcaster, and former editor of Curve magazine, where she honed her passion for writing about social justice and sex (and their frequent intersection). Her work has appeared on Dread Central, Elite Daily, Tecca, and Joystiq, and she podcasts regularly about horror on the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network. She can’t live without cats, vintage style, video games, drag queens, or the Oxford comma.

Rachel Shatto, Editor in Chief of PRIDE.com, is an SF Bay Area-based writer, podcaster, and former editor of Curve magazine, where she honed her passion for writing about social justice and sex (and their frequent intersection). Her work has appeared on Dread Central, Elite Daily, Tecca, and Joystiq, and she podcasts regularly about horror on the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network. She can’t live without cats, vintage style, video games, drag queens, or the Oxford comma.