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Playboy Plans to Stop Publishing Nude Photos in 2016

Playboy Plans to Stop Publishing Nude Photos in 2016

Playboy Plans to Stop Publishing Nude Photos in 2016

Nudes will be no more next year. Now catch up on how Playboy plans to change its image to fit the modern age.

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There's officially too much sex on the internet. Well, there's too much for Playboy to contend with at least, and according to this New York Times piece, top editor Cory Jones and editor-in-chief Hugh Hefner agree it's time for a change. As of March, 2016, the magazine will no longer feature fully nude photos of women, which, of course, it's been famously known for for decades. There's some pretty epic irony going on in regard to this revamp, since the company admits that the reason these changes are being made is actually because Playboy succeeded at its goal. “That battle has been fought and won,” said Playboy's chief executive, Scott Flanders, “You’re now one click away from every sex act imaginable for free. And so it’s just passé at this juncture.” And numbers don't lie. According to the article, readership has dropped from 5.6 million in 1975 to 800,000 now, so even though the redesign seems risky, it also might be the only way Playboy can stay in the game. 

For those wondering what's left for Playboy if it won't feature nudity (though they still plan to feature "provocative poses"), the piece brings up the historical and cultural significance the magazine has had in the past, including interviews with Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., and Jimmy Carter, as well as stories and photo shoots featuring superstars like Madonna, Naomi Campbell, and Marilyn Monroe on the very first issue. At the time, and for quite a while, Playboy was concerned revolutionary, but times have changed. Playboy's website already ditched nudity in August of 2014, and its social media has been playing it safe too. As for the redesign, Jones declared his new vision for the publication to be more modern and "PG-13." Additionally, Jones also says that there will be a "sex-positive female" sex columnist on the team, and that the dedication to investigative journalism and interviews will stay intact. There will also be a heavier focus on visual art to attract younger audiences.

This truly is the end of a lifelong era for Playboy, and there certainly seems to be a lot on the line here with this substantial reimagining of such familiar content. The company insists that the magazine "remains relevant," and we can't wait to see just how this new, risky model works out.

 

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Preston Max Allen