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We Totally Get Why Demi Lovato Said Goodbye to Social Media

We Totally Get Why Demi Lovato Said Goodbye to Social Media

We Totally Get Why Demi Lovato Said Goodbye to Social Media

Sometimes the hate is just *too* much.

RachelCharleneL

The super talented and super beautiful pop star Demi Lovato made a decision yesterday that many of us wish we were brave enough to make: she decided to cut back on social media. She got real on Twitter, calling out the BS she’s been dealing with and announcing her departure from both Twitter and Instagram.

Amidst cyber bullying and the general negativity prevalent on most social media platforms, Lovato realized that silencing at least a few of her feeds was a form of self care. And can you blame her? No matter how few followers you have, it’s likely that you’ve run into at least one troll, and the more popular you are, the more likely it is that your mentions are filled with aggressive hate. While it seems like it should be easy to ignore, constant negativity gets at the best of us.

It sucks, because social media can be used for such good. From the the recent #QueerSelfLove hashtag to the Black Lives Matter movement started by two queer women of color to queer communities found online, social media has played a major role in connecting and finding solidarity.

But social media isn’t far from real life, and so it exists within the context of bigotry, negativity, and general hate. Competition is real, and it’s hard to act like social media isn’t majorly shaped by a constant battle to be the one on top.

Luckily, Lovato has decided to still stick with us on Snapchat.

Remember to take care of yourself when it comes to social media use, and take breaks as necessary. Sometimes, the hate is just too much, and there’s no shame in needing a pause.

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Rachel Charlene Lewis

Rachel Charlene Lewis is a writer, editor, and queer woman of color based in North Carolina. Her writing has most recently appeared in Ravishly, Hello Giggles, and elsewhere.

Rachel Charlene Lewis is a writer, editor, and queer woman of color based in North Carolina. Her writing has most recently appeared in Ravishly, Hello Giggles, and elsewhere.