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Lil Nas X Helped His Brother Come Out, Too

Lil Nas X Helped His Brother Come Out, Too

Lil Nas X
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The out musician’’s documentary revealed how living his truth helped his brother feel ready to share his identity.

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Lil Nas X is always reminding us of the power of representation. For many fans, the out musician has offered a view into the power of being openly, unapologetically, and loudly, queer. And it turns out that authenticity was meaningful close to home as well.

In the new documentary Lil Nas X: Long Live Montero, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival on Saturday one scene stood out as especially powerful. in it Nas and his younger brother, Tramon Hill, open up about how Nas being open and talking about his queer identity helped his brother come to terms with his own bisexuality.

“My brother really opened doors for a lot of people,” Hil said in the film. “Yeah, he opened a door for me.

“What I mean by that, like, I’m not gay, though, you feel me? I’m bisexual.

“He helped me be real with myself. My brother made me more open to it.”

While Hill knew he was bisexual he still feared how coming out would impact the relationships in his life, but Nas’ example helped him become confident enough to throw open the closet doors anyway.

These days Hill is proud to call himself bisexual and if people decide they don't want to be in his life anymore because of his identity, well Hill says that’s on them.

“Get out of my presence. I don’t need you,” he said “At the end of the day, people are going to f**k with who they f**k with, so stop trying to chase a friend. A friend is going to always be there.”

Well said. Lil Nas X: Long Live Montero premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival after a delay caused by a bomb threat that was reportedly directed at Nas due to his sexuality.

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Rachel Shatto

EIC of PRIDE.com

Rachel Shatto, Editor in Chief of PRIDE.com, is an SF Bay Area-based writer, podcaster, and former editor of Curve magazine, where she honed her passion for writing about social justice and sex (and their frequent intersection). Her work has appeared on Elite Daily, Tecca, and Joystiq, and she podcasts regularly about horror on the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network. She can’t live without cats, vintage style, video games, drag queens, or the Oxford comma.

Rachel Shatto, Editor in Chief of PRIDE.com, is an SF Bay Area-based writer, podcaster, and former editor of Curve magazine, where she honed her passion for writing about social justice and sex (and their frequent intersection). Her work has appeared on Elite Daily, Tecca, and Joystiq, and she podcasts regularly about horror on the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network. She can’t live without cats, vintage style, video games, drag queens, or the Oxford comma.