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The 13 Best (and Worst) Things About Being a Queer Person of Color

The 13 Best (and Worst) Things About Being a Queer Person of Color

The 13 Best (and Worst) Things About Being a Queer Person of Color

Being a QPOC comes with unique challenges.

RachelCharleneL

Photo: Kristin Vog

Being a person of color in the LGBTQ community can be really, really rough, but also really, really awesome. Sometimes, you feel excluded and alone, but when you find your people within the community, there is so much empowerment to be found. So what are the best and worst parts?

1. Best: When your meet another QPOC

2. Worst: When your non-queer POC friends are homophobic

3. Best: When you really connect with other QPOC

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4. Worst: When your queer friends are racist

5. Best: When your queer white friends are anti-racism

6. Worst: When queer white people say racism is over, and only homophobia is real now

7. Best: When queer people understand the intersection between racism and homophobia

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8. Worst: When you have to deal with white guilt from white queer people

9. Best: When white queer people understand what it means to be an ally

10. Worst: When your white queer friends expect you to speak for your race and educate them on EVERYTHING

11. Best: When your friends love, care for, and adore you, instead of seeing you as a spokesperson

12. Worst: When white queer people say they only date other white people

13. Best: When people understand the role racism has on their preferences

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Rachel Charlene Lewis

Rachel Charlene Lewis is a writer, editor, and queer woman of color based in North Carolina. Her writing has most recently appeared in Ravishly, Hello Giggles, and elsewhere.

Rachel Charlene Lewis is a writer, editor, and queer woman of color based in North Carolina. Her writing has most recently appeared in Ravishly, Hello Giggles, and elsewhere.