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Jerry Seinfeld is CRAVING the return of 'dominant masculinity' and the internet is ROASTING

Jerry Seinfeld is CRAVING the return of 'dominant masculinity' and the internet is ROASTING

Jerry Seined went on the Honestly with Bari Weiss and said he missed dominant masculinity
Michael Mattes/Shutterstock

The comedian wants to return to a 1960s version of masculinity. No thanks!

Jerry Seinfeld may have been known for his funny social commentary in the '90s, but now he rails against cancel culture and talks about his nostalgia for "dominant masculinity." CRINGE.

On May 28, the comedian appeared on the Honestly with Bari Weiss podcast, where he talked about his new critically panned film Unfrosted, which he starred in and made his directorial debut. The Netflix film chronicles the fictional invention of the Pop-Tart and is set in the 1960s, when Seinfeld grew up, People reports.

"... There's another element there that I think is the key element, and that is an agreed upon hierarchy, which I think is absolutely vaporized in today's moment," he said. "I think that is why people lean on the horn and drive in the crazy way that they drive, because we have no sense of hierarchy. And as humans, we don't really feel comfortable like that."

The 70-year-old comedian added, "If you want to talk about nostalgia, that is part of what makes that moment attractive looking back."

Then Seinfeld displayed big Boomer energy when he talked about his nostalgia for "real" men like President John F. Kennedy, boxer Muhammad Ali, actor Sean Connery, and sports broadcaster Howard Cosell.

"You can go all the way down the line — that's a real man — I want to be like that someday. Well, no. I never really grew up," he said. "I mean, you don't want to, as a comedian, because it's a childish pursuit, but I miss a dominant masculinity. Yeah, I get the [toxic masculinity] but still, I like a real man."

Between Dave Chappell, Matt Rife, and now Seinfeld, it seems that straight men may need to put down the microphones for a while.

The internet heard Seinfeld's regressive view of masculinity and clapped back with hilarious jabs at the Bee Movie star. People took to X (formerly Twitter) to point out that Seinfeld may not be the best candidate for the arbiter of what is and isn't masculine, using his own TV show as evidence.

"Yes the "dominant masculinity" for which Jerry Seinfeld is well known…," someone wrote alongside a GIF of Seinfeld wearing the infamous ruffled pirate shirt from an episode of his eponymous show.

"jerry seinfeld must want more dom daddies in his life because he has never been part of this 'dominant masculinity' demographic he is speaking of," someone else posted.

Other people were quick to poke fun at Seinfeld's personal life, including his dating a 17-year-old when he was 38. One person wrote, "Whiner Jerry Seinfeld dated a high schooler when he was almost 40. Saying he misses dominant masculinity is the first thing he's ever said that made me laugh."

But Seinfeld should be able to take these jokes in stride since he said that comedians can't be worried about what people think of them during the same podcast appearance. "If you're built right as a stand-up comic you don't care what people think of [you]," he said. "I'm doing my gig, I'm getting the laughs and getting the money and getting the hell out of here. When your review comes out, I'm in another city doing the same thing."

Seinfeld's own jokes may not make us laugh anymore, but watching the entire internet dunk on him is hysterical, and we can't get enough!

Keep scrolling for more funny responses to Seinfeld's opinion on masculinity.

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Ariel Messman-Rucker

Ariel Messman-Rucker is an Oakland-born journalist who now calls the Pacific Northwest her home. When she’s not writing about politics and queer pop culture, she can be found reading, hiking, or talking about horror movies with the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network.

Ariel Messman-Rucker is an Oakland-born journalist who now calls the Pacific Northwest her home. When she’s not writing about politics and queer pop culture, she can be found reading, hiking, or talking about horror movies with the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network.