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Conservatives Lose It Over Garth Brooks' Inclusive New Bar & Bud Light (Again)

Conservatives Lose It Over Garth Brooks' Inclusive New Bar & Bud Light

Garth Brooks
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The country singer draws ire & boycotts from the right for passing the lowest bar possible for allyship.

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Garth Brooks is drawing the ire of conservatives for passing the lowest bar possible for queer allyship: Vowing to serve Bud Light in his new Nashville-based bar Friends in Low Places.

During a Q&A with Billboard, the country legend discussed his new business saying “I want it to be a place you feel safe in. I want it to be a place that you feel like there are manners and people love one another,” adding, “Yes, we’re going to serve every brand of beer. We just are.”

To be fair, allyship is always welcome, especially in spaces like the country music industry where that hasn’t always been the case, but it’s also disheartening that the most basic expectation that a business would not actively exclude queer people has to be considered noteworthy, and worthy of gratitude.

Compared with other people in the music industry’s reaction to Bud Light partnering with trans influencer Dylan Mulvaney — like country singer John Rich suspending the sale of Bud Light at his bae on Nashville’s Broadway or country aesthetic appropriating Michigander Kid Rock shooting up a case of Bud Light — Brooks’ move both feels like progress and even radical.

Sigh.

Brooks affirmed that Friends in Low Places — which is set to open this summer — will be a place where patrons can expect to feel love, and not hate. “Our thing is this: if you come into this house, love one another,” he said. “If you’re an asshole, there are plenty of other places on lower Broadway to go.”

Naturally, conservatives are in full meltdown over Brooks’s statements.


However, fans on social media were quick to point out why Brooks’s comments on inclusion should not come as a shock to anyone who has been paying attention to him — and his lyrics — for decades.

“Just a reminder that Garth Brooks single handedly changed the entire country music scene in the 90s. Radio stations changed formats, bars installed wooden floors for line dancing. His restaurant will be fine without terrible customers.”

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Rachel Shatto

EIC of PRIDE.com

Rachel Shatto, Editor in Chief of PRIDE.com, is an SF Bay Area-based writer, podcaster, and former editor of Curve magazine, where she honed her passion for writing about social justice and sex (and their frequent intersection). Her work has appeared on Dread Central, Elite Daily, Tecca, and Joystiq, and she podcasts regularly about horror on the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network. She can’t live without cats, vintage style, video games, drag queens, or the Oxford comma.

Rachel Shatto, Editor in Chief of PRIDE.com, is an SF Bay Area-based writer, podcaster, and former editor of Curve magazine, where she honed her passion for writing about social justice and sex (and their frequent intersection). Her work has appeared on Dread Central, Elite Daily, Tecca, and Joystiq, and she podcasts regularly about horror on the Zombie Grrlz Horror Podcast Network. She can’t live without cats, vintage style, video games, drag queens, or the Oxford comma.